• Therapeutic Parenting

    Here, Deputy CEO Janise Mitchell discusses therapeutic parenting, its theoretical underpinning and its implications for practice.

  • What if the world hurts?

    What if your teacher’s voice feels like a dentist drill? What if the walls of your classroom feel like they are crowded and moving? What if the seam on your sock drives you to distraction and makes it almost impossible to listen to what is being said to you? Beth Guy looks at the topic of sensory defensiveness and what it means for children and young people as well as those who support them.

  • Sexting and Young People

    If you work with young people, you no doubt know about sexting – the act of sending nude or provocative pictures via text on mobile phone or social media.  What you may not know is that doing so amounts to a criminal offense under Commonwealth Law, even if all parties are willing.

  • All at sea with children's behaviour

    When discussing the behaviours of children with parents in our Bringing up Great Kids parent groups, we offer them a fresh way of viewing and thinking about what they see in children’s behaviours.  This blog entry looks at our model and how we use it. 
  • Transforming Trauma in Schools

    Children and young people around Australia are struggling to participate in school life because their brains are shutting down due to toxic stress. When exposed to levels of high stress like trauma and abuse, children and young people can struggle to follow simple instructions even - resulting in them often being perceived as naughty kids.
  • Big Day Scout

    Recently, we were invited to participate in the Big Day Scout, the largest gathering of Scouts in Victoria in the last 50 years.
  • An interview with Cathy Malchiodi – Part 2

    In December last year, we published the first of a two-part interview with Cathy Malchiodi. Here, Cathy is continuing her answer to the question “What is the neuroscience behind creative and art therapies”, specifically discussing research around sensory based interventions, non-verbal communication and right hemisphere dominance.

  • Leaves of Hope

    Perhaps you have asked yourself how you might impart hope with your clients? An outcome of change for children, bringing with it possibilities for fun, enthusiasm and optimism, it is possibly also something we struggle to pinpoint for ourselves as we journey with clients. 

    In this blog entry, Lauren Thomas shares a story of hope found in the recovery process of a young person we've worked with.

  • Championing the #NotAnotherChild cause

    The topic of child abuse leaves many people feeling somewhat overwhelmed, disempowered and uncertain about how they can play a part in the protection of children. Much of the #NotAnotherChild campaign is aimed at redressing this gap in understanding, so that as a community, we all begin to feel more confident in engaging with the issue in ways that make a meaningful difference.  In this blog entry, Dani Colvin highlights two examples of how members of the Australian community have used their abilities to help start conversation and increase awareness of child abuse.

  • Review of a golden oldie!

    Here Lynne Kennedy, Senior Training Consultant in the ACF Parenting Education and Support Program, reviews a book now in it's 30th edition that still holds relevance today. 
    "HOW TO TALK SO KIDS WILL LISTEN AND LISTEN SO KIDS WILL TALK" 

  • Principles of Out of Home Care Reform - Part 1

    Part 1 in a series of posts discussing principles of Out of Home Care reform.  Here, Janise Mitchell discusses the principle which - in her view - is one of the most the most critical outcome measures of success of any out of home care system. 

  • From theory to practice

    Marina Dickson looks at the benefits and importance of learning for professionals working with children who have experienced trauma.

  • An Interview with Stephen Porges

    Stephen Porges’ Polyvagal Theory is the product of decades of research and has already informed the trauma work of thousands of therapists worldwide.  In town recently for the 2014 International Childhood Trauma Conference, he sat down with Dr Joe Tucci to discuss how his theory informs his latest project: a research partnership with the Australian Childhood Foundation.

  • Changes in child protection law - what you need to know

    Our work with the Safeguarding Children Program sees us connecting with a wide variety of organisations around Australia who are working with children and young people.  One issue that proves tricky for many, is the constantly changing legislative landscape.  We thought we might use this post to bring you up to date with some of the new laws in Victoria that affect ALL ADULTS in Victoria. We will look at other states and territories in subsequent posts.

  • The legacy of Robin Clark

    Robin Clarke ongoing inspiration

    Robyn Clark provides an on-going inspiration for all who work to promote the rights of and the protection of children in Australia. Here Noel Macnamara reflects on the impact she still has on his own work, and how her legacy might inspire us all.

  • Safe and Secure

    A free, downloadable trauma informed practice guide for understanding and responding to children and young people affected by family violence.

  • "The right to think and believe what they want"

    Article 14 of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child states that

    “Children have the right to think and believe what they want and to practise their religion, so long as they are not stopping other people from enjoying their rights.  Parents should guide children on these matters.” 

  • What is trauma?

    Depending on who or what you read, trauma will be defined in a variety of ways. Is it simple or complex? Developmental, relational or attachment oriented? Within the field of childhood trauma we have a multitude of definitions and sub categories that can be quite confusing for practitioners.

     

  • Luke's life matters

    A coronial inquest has begun into the death of a little boy who loved cricket and football. He was a little boy with a shining smile. He had gentle eyes.

  • 8 things Therapists using social media should know

    Recently, a friend of mine told me she had started seeing a therapist. She was really pleased about her decision, and felt they had good rapport. After chatting for a minute or so about it, she sheepishly added that I knew the therapist in question - which she had discovered by looking her up on social media and saw that we were connected.