• Songs of change and harmony

    Foundation CEO, Dr Joe Tucci, explores the connection between the songs of whales and the collective 'song' of professionals who work in the trauma community; asking what it is that we need to keep growing, to keep resourcing each other and to continue to improve outcomes for children and young people.

  • Healing the Past by Nurturing the Future

    Healing the Past

    A new Aboriginal-led project aims to learn how to identify and support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander parents who have experienced complex trauma in their own childhoods. 

  • What is love?

    The recent launch of ACF’s new logo and the narrative of love that accompanies it has prompted me to consider this concept of love in our work with traumatised children.  Having love as a value seems fundamental to everything we do in both our personal and professional lives. Yet, when we unpack what love means in the context of children who have experienced trauma, it is way more complex.
  • Schools as Service Providers

    Guest blogger, registered psychologist and school counsellor Deborah Costa shares her model around Trauma Informed systems and services for school as service providers.
  • The Nature and Nurture of Parenting

    How do we learn to be parents? Is it nature? Is it nurture? Jeanette Miller considers two different approaches and reflects on what parents who have themselves experienced trauma might need.

  • "I will die without my music"

    Young people love their music. It is a well- researched and documented phenomenon.  Here, music therapist, adolescent specialist and guest blogger Carmen Cheong-Clinch explores the relationships between young people, their music and mental health care.

  • The impact of trauma on sibling relationships

    A growing body of literature supports the critical role of siblings in helping children and young people in OoHC maintain a sense of continuity with family.  Here, Noel MacNamara explores the literature and the gaps within it, highlighting how trauma damages the capacity for children and young people to benefit from relationships with adults, and from the growth of healthy sibling connections.

  • What comes after trauma-informed practice?

    Knowledge of the neurobiology of trauma has shaped our work for at least 15 years now.  We have advocated that being trauma-informed is essential... but what comes next? Foundation CEO Dr Joe Tucci shares his projections of what the field of childhood trauma needs now.

  • Untying the Knot

    Have you ever wondered how trauma impacts care systems?  In what ways can the emergent properties of fragmentation or integration change the service outcomes? Dilip Balu poses this question and shares his thoughts on the ability for such a system to consistently provide care that helps clients also achieve health and integration.

  • Child abuse and suicide: a harmful correlation - Part 2

    Part 2 in the series looking at the strong correlation between suicide and early childhood sexual assault.  We thought we’d take the opportunity over two blog posts, to discuss the research literature and then share some ideas about how we might contribute to better work with this vulnerable population.

  • Child abuse and suicide: a harmful correlation - Part 1

    In our practice experience and in the research, there is little doubt that there is a strong correlation between suicide and early childhood sexual assault, in particular that perpetrated by members of an individual’s family.  We thought we’d take the opportunity over two blog posts, to discuss the research literature and then share some ideas about how we might contribute to better work with this vulnerable population.
  • How trauma hijacks learning - A memo from a four year old

    How might a four year old describe the impact of trauma on their ability to learn?  In today's blog entry Jeanette Miller, Consultant in the Parenting and Early Learning Program at the Australian Childhood Foundation explores the topic, informed by our understanding of neurobiology and developmental trauma.

  • Why being trauma informed matters beyond trauma

    Prosody Blog Melissa Raine

    Dr Melissa Raine considers how Australian culture understands children, how trauma informed responses might impact work with all children, and how the discussion is pertinent to a forthcoming symposium on 'Children's Voices in Contemporary Australia'.

  • Trauma-Informed Goal Setting

    Is there such a thing as trauma informed goal setting in practice with vulnerable children, young people and their families? CEO Joe Tucci seeks to answer this question here.

  • Assessment Part 4

    The fourth article in this series of articles on assessment, here we examine how to conceptualise and assess the needs of children and families as it related to case planning and intervention.

  • Engaging Traumatised Parents in the School Environment

    For many of us, school holds fond memories but for others, school holds many triggers for trauma – the oval where they were bullied, the corridor where they were physically assaulted, the classroom where they were often publicly humiliated, the sting and the shame of corporal punishment, the principal’s office where they were frequently suspended. And I wonder if we, as educators, have ever stopped to walk through the school gates in the shoes of our most vulnerable parents?
  • Developmental Trauma Informed Maps... Why do we need them?

    What is a Developmental Trauma Informed Map? This grandly titled document actually asks participants to articulate the core messages of this body of knowledge and think about how it can underpin practice on a daily basis. Marina Dickson explains more...

  • Does trauma-informed = stronger practice?

    In this interview, Deanna reflects on her experience of studying the Graduate Certificate in Developmental Trauma and the personal and professional outcomes that continue to influence her contribution to the sector.
  • Mental Health, Young People and Trauma

    Increased diagnosis in mental health may be masking our understanding of, and response to, behaviours that are really manifestations of trauma writes Alexa Duke.

  • 9 Plain English Principles of Trauma Informed Care

    The trauma literature can be overwhelming. Its basis in neuroscience offers incredible insights into its impact. But it also is challenging to decipher and make relevant to the ways in which children that have experienced abuse and neglect can be effectively supported.  

    So here, are our top nine principles of trauma informed care – in plain English.
  • Transforming Trauma in Schools

    Children and young people around Australia are struggling to participate in school life because their brains are shutting down due to toxic stress. When exposed to levels of high stress like trauma and abuse, children and young people can struggle to follow simple instructions even - resulting in them often being perceived as naughty kids.
  • An interview with Cathy Malchiodi – Part 2

    In December last year, we published the first of a two-part interview with Cathy Malchiodi. Here, Cathy is continuing her answer to the question “What is the neuroscience behind creative and art therapies”, specifically discussing research around sensory based interventions, non-verbal communication and right hemisphere dominance.

  • What is trauma?

    Depending on who or what you read, trauma will be defined in a variety of ways. Is it simple or complex? Developmental, relational or attachment oriented? Within the field of childhood trauma we have a multitude of definitions and sub categories that can be quite confusing for practitioners.